“Stained-Glass Windows of First Presbyterian Church”
Sep
14
10:30 AM10:30

“Stained-Glass Windows of First Presbyterian Church”

In this Lecture, Dr. Robbie Castleman will explain the history and significance behind the stained-glass windows in Siloam Springs’ First Presbyterian Church. The congregation dates back to 1874 (in Hico) and was a part of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, a “border state” denomination after the Civil War.

There will be a lecture at the Museum, followed by a short walk to the Church to view the windows.

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Museum Book Club Meeting
Jul
9
7:00 PM19:00

Museum Book Club Meeting

We invite you to read "Spying on the South" by Tony Horwitz for discussion on July 9 in 28 Springs Restaurant at 7pm (come at 6:30 to eat).

You may remember Horwitz as the author of "Confederates in the Attic" which we read a few years ago. In "Spying on the South" he follows the trail of Frederick Law Olmsted. Before designing Central Park, Olmsted took two trips across the south in the 1850s and recorded his impressions in the "New York Times" and later in a series of three books. Horwitz follows Olmsted's route across the south, and sometimes his mode of transportation, then compares Olmsted's impressions of this region on the eve of the Civil War with his impressions of today's divisions.

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“Stained-Glass Windows of First Presbyterian Church”
Jun
15
10:30 AM10:30

“Stained-Glass Windows of First Presbyterian Church”

In this Lecture, Dr. Robbie Castleman will explain the history and significance behind the stained-glass windows in Siloam Springs’ First Presbyterian Church. The congregation dates back to 1874 (in Hico) and was a part of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, a “border state” denomination after the Civil War.

There will be a lecture at the Museum, followed by a short walk to the Church to view the windows.

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Museum Book Club Meeting - True Grit
May
14
7:00 PM19:00

Museum Book Club Meeting - True Grit

For our next literary endeavor, we will be blurring the lines of history and fiction with Charles Portis’s novel True Grit. The 1968 novel was originally published as a serial in The Saturday Evening Post. This novel is a celebrated piece of American literature that displays life as it was when Fort Smith was the frontier to the West in the 1870s. We hope you will join us for a great discussion of True Grit at Birra-Vino's at 7 pm (6:30 if you would like to join us for dinner).

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'Arkansas Conference College' lecture by Dr. Preston Jones
May
11
6:00 PM18:00

'Arkansas Conference College' lecture by Dr. Preston Jones

Arkansas Conference College was founded in Siloam Springs in 1899. It closed in 1919, the year John Brown University began. The school's founding president, Thomas Mason, had previously been president of Philander Smith College in Little Rock. Mason is buried in Siloam Springs. ACC challenges some of the assumptions people might have of Siloam Springs 100 years ago. Though it was a small school in a small town, students were not admitted unless they were able to translate the Latin works of Julius Caesar into English. 

The talk draws almost completely from materials found in the Siloam Springs Museum archives.

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'Native Americans of NWA' lecture by Dr. George Sabo
May
4
1:00 PM13:00

'Native Americans of NWA' lecture by Dr. George Sabo

American Indian history is a story of resilience in the face of ever-changing circumstances. The history of Native American landscapes in northwest Arkansas is, accordingly, complicated by a succession of social and environmental events. This presentation briefly summarizes current understandings based on information derived from archaeological investigations, documentary sources, and indigenous oral history.

 

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'Historical Churches of Siloam Springs' lecture by Don Warden
Apr
20
6:00 PM18:00

'Historical Churches of Siloam Springs' lecture by Don Warden

This talk will look primarily at church buildings in Siloam Springs before 1950, many of which are still standing. Most have been used by different denominations over time, and many include additions or other changes to the building. Using historical photos, maps and other documents we will look at the wide variety of church buildings that have housed the congregations of Siloam Springs.

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Spring Walking Tour
Apr
13
10:00 AM10:00

Spring Walking Tour

Join us for a walking tour of downtown Siloam Springs. Don Warden, our researcher and collections manager, will lead the tour. To join, simply meet at the Museum (112 N. Maxwell St.) at 10:00 am.

In case of inclement weather: the Spring Walking Tour will be held on May 18 from 10-12. Keep an eye out on Facebook and our website for announcements relating to schedule changes. If the weather is dry on Saturday (4/13) we will continue with the walking tour as scheduled.

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'The Iron Horse Comes to Town: The Railroads of Siloam Springs' lecture by Mike Sypult
Apr
6
6:00 PM18:00

'The Iron Horse Comes to Town: The Railroads of Siloam Springs' lecture by Mike Sypult

Join us as we explore the coming of the railroads to Siloam Springs beginning in 1893 and continuing to this day.  Beginning with the Arthur Stilwell’s “P&G” building southward to the Gulf coast and the short-lived “Peavine” extending to Rogers and Fayetteville, Siloam Springs has a rich history of railroad development in the region.  Learn more about the “Flying Crow” and “Southern Belle” that once graced the city and transported mail and passengers from New Orleans to Kansas City and beyond.  From steam locomotives to modern diesels, the story of the Iron Horse in Siloam Springs will be a memorable one!

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Reopening
Mar
30
10:00 AM10:00

Reopening

Join us Saturday, March 30 for:

Ribbon Cutting: 10:00 am

All day celebration

Museum tours

And two fine art exhibits:

‘Circle of Life’ - an exhibit by local artist Troy Anderson

and

‘Siloam Springs from the Perspective of Art’ - an exhibit of art from the Museum’s collection

 

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'Bronze Casting' lecture by Troy Anderson
Mar
23
6:00 PM18:00

'Bronze Casting' lecture by Troy Anderson

In this lecture, Troy Anderson will explain the fascinating and complex process of lost-wax bronze casting. This process dates back to the 3rd millennium BCE. Lost-wax castings have been created by many different civilizations throughout history, and are still being made today. There are many steps involved, and the process is time consuming. Mr. Anderson will explain the techniques he uses to create his bronze casts using this method.

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Museum Book Club Meeting
Mar
12
7:00 PM19:00

Museum Book Club Meeting

Topic of Discussion:

A Prayer for Owen Meany, published in 1989, Is a meditation on faith and doubt. The narrator of the story, John Wheelwright, reflects on his childhood throughout the novel. The story revolves around his friendship with Owen Meany, a dwarf with religious revelations that have implications throughout the course of the characters’ lives. The novel touches on political and social conflicts during the time of Wheelwright’s writing (the 1980s) and throughout his childhood and young adult life (beginning in the 1950s). The novel’s setting overlaps with some of the most memorable times in the second half of America’s twentieth century, including the Vietnam War and the Reagan administration.

Irving drew inspiration from The Tin Drum by Günter Grass and The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne. A Prayer for Owen Meany was voted one of America’s favorite 100 novels for the PBS Great American Read program in 2018. It has been adapted into a film (Simon Birch, 1998), multiple plays, and a five-part BBC radio play (A Prayer for Owen Meany, 2009).

John Irving, an incredibly prolific modern American novelist, was born in 1942 in New Hampshire. His works include The World According to Garp, The Cider House Rules, A Widow for One Year, and many other novels and short stories. He has won multiple awards for his novels and screenplays and is regarded as one of today’s modern classic writers. Irving continues to write today.

We will be meeting at 7:00, but come at 6:30 if you would like to join us for dinner.

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Museum Book Club Meeting
Jan
28
6:30 PM18:30

Museum Book Club Meeting

Museum Book Club Meeting:

Time: January 28, 7 PM

Place: Birra-Vinos (come at 6:30 if you want to join us for dinner)

Topic: Discussion of The Deerslayer (or The First War-Path) by James Fenimore Cooper. It is the first of 5 Leatherstocking Tales. The Leatherstocking Tales is a series of five novels by American writer James Fenimore Cooper, set in the eighteenth century era of development in the primarily former Iroquois areas in central New York. Each novel features Natty Bumpo, a frontiersman known to European-American settlers as "Leatherstocking", "The Pathfinder", and "the trapper." Native Americans call him "Deerslayer", "La Longue Carabine" ("Long Rifle" in French), and "Hawkeye."

 Author: James Fenimore Cooper (September 15, 1789 – September 14, 1851) was an American writer of the first half of the 19th century. His historical romances draw a picture of frontier and American Indian life in the early American days which created a unique form of American literature. He lived most of his life in Cooperstown, New York, which was founded by his father William on property that he owned. Cooper was a lifelong member of the Episcopal Church and contributed generously to it. He attended Yale University for three years, where he was a member of the Linonian Society.

These books can be bought very inexpensively on-line.

See you there!



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