'Bronze Casting' lecture by Troy Anderson
Mar
23
6:00 PM18:00

'Bronze Casting' lecture by Troy Anderson

In this lecture, Troy Anderson will explain the fascinating and complex process of lost-wax bronze casting. This process dates back to the 3rd millennium BCE. Lost-wax castings have been created by many different civilizations throughout history, and are still being made today. There are many steps involved, and the process is time consuming. Mr. Anderson will explain the techniques he uses to create his bronze casts using this method.

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Reopening
Mar
30
10:00 AM10:00

Reopening

Join us Saturday, March 30 for:

Ribbon Cutting: 10:00 am

All day celebration

Museum tours

And two fine art exhibits:

‘Circle of Life’ - an exhibit by local artist Troy Anderson

and

‘Siloam Springs from the Perspective of Art’ - an exhibit of art from the Museum’s collection

 

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'Native Americans of NWA' lecture by Dr. George Sabo
Apr
6
6:00 PM18:00

'Native Americans of NWA' lecture by Dr. George Sabo

American Indian history is a story of resilience in the face of ever-changing circumstances. The history of Native American landscapes in northwest Arkansas is, accordingly, complicated by a succession of social and environmental events. This presentation briefly summarizes current understandings based on information derived from archaeological investigations, documentary sources, and indigenous oral history.

 

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Museum Lecture Series
May
9
11:00 AM11:00

Museum Lecture Series

Join us for a series of 6 lectures on local history. Lecturers include local artist Troy Anderson, Dr. George Sabo, Dr. Preston Jones, Don Warden, Mike Sypult, and Rick Parker. Topics include bronze casting, the Native American Landscape in Northwest Arkansas, the Arkansas Conference College, historic churches of Siloam Springs, the railroads of Siloam Springs, and guerrillas of Northwest Arkansas.

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Museum Book Club Meeting
Mar
12
7:00 PM19:00

Museum Book Club Meeting

Topic of Discussion:

A Prayer for Owen Meany, published in 1989, Is a meditation on faith and doubt. The narrator of the story, John Wheelwright, reflects on his childhood throughout the novel. The story revolves around his friendship with Owen Meany, a dwarf with religious revelations that have implications throughout the course of the characters’ lives. The novel touches on political and social conflicts during the time of Wheelwright’s writing (the 1980s) and throughout his childhood and young adult life (beginning in the 1950s). The novel’s setting overlaps with some of the most memorable times in the second half of America’s twentieth century, including the Vietnam War and the Reagan administration.

Irving drew inspiration from The Tin Drum by Günter Grass and The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne. A Prayer for Owen Meany was voted one of America’s favorite 100 novels for the PBS Great American Read program in 2018. It has been adapted into a film (Simon Birch, 1998), multiple plays, and a five-part BBC radio play (A Prayer for Owen Meany, 2009).

John Irving, an incredibly prolific modern American novelist, was born in 1942 in New Hampshire. His works include The World According to Garp, The Cider House Rules, A Widow for One Year, and many other novels and short stories. He has won multiple awards for his novels and screenplays and is regarded as one of today’s modern classic writers. Irving continues to write today.

We will be meeting at 7:00, but come at 6:30 if you would like to join us for dinner.

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Museum Book Club Meeting
Jan
28
6:30 PM18:30

Museum Book Club Meeting

Museum Book Club Meeting:

Time: January 28, 7 PM

Place: Birra-Vinos (come at 6:30 if you want to join us for dinner)

Topic: Discussion of The Deerslayer (or The First War-Path) by James Fenimore Cooper. It is the first of 5 Leatherstocking Tales. The Leatherstocking Tales is a series of five novels by American writer James Fenimore Cooper, set in the eighteenth century era of development in the primarily former Iroquois areas in central New York. Each novel features Natty Bumpo, a frontiersman known to European-American settlers as "Leatherstocking", "The Pathfinder", and "the trapper." Native Americans call him "Deerslayer", "La Longue Carabine" ("Long Rifle" in French), and "Hawkeye."

 Author: James Fenimore Cooper (September 15, 1789 – September 14, 1851) was an American writer of the first half of the 19th century. His historical romances draw a picture of frontier and American Indian life in the early American days which created a unique form of American literature. He lived most of his life in Cooperstown, New York, which was founded by his father William on property that he owned. Cooper was a lifelong member of the Episcopal Church and contributed generously to it. He attended Yale University for three years, where he was a member of the Linonian Society.

These books can be bought very inexpensively on-line.

See you there!



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